Wednesday, 4 February 2015

International UDC Seminar 2015 "Classification and Authority Control: Expanding Resource Discovery" - CALL FOR PAPERS



DATE:     29-30 October 2015
VENUE:    National Library of Portugal - Lisbon
WEBSITE:    http://seminar.udcc.org/2015/
CONTACT:    seminar2015@udcc.org

Linked data practices and techniques have opened new possibilities in exploiting controlled vocabularies and improving resource discovery. Authority data held in library systems, including classification schemes find new ways of expanding its potential as shared knowledge structures across the linked data environment. The objective of this conference is to explore such a potential, expanding the value and use of classification as authority controlled vocabulary, from the local perspective to the global environment.

We invite experts in authority control, classification schemes and linked data to provide overviews, illustrations and analysis of classification data management and exploitation. Contributions are welcome on high quality, innovative research and practice on the following topics:

•    Classification as a component of subject authority control
•    Classification authority data formats and modeling
•    Classification and multilingual subject access
•    Sharing classification data from authority files
•    Classification data in the open linked data context


CONTRIBUTIONS:

Two kinds of contributions are invited: conference papers and posters. Authors should submit a paper proposal in the form of an extended abstract (1000-1200 words, including references, for papers; and 500-600 words for posters). The submission form is provided on the conference website.

Proposals will be reviewed by the Programme Committee consisting of an international panel of experts. Each submission will undergo a blind review by at least three reviewers. The Conference proceedings will be published by Ergon Verlag and will be distributed at the conference.

IMPORTANT DATES
    28 February 2015    Paper proposal submission deadline
    23 March 2015    Notification of acceptance & paper submission instructions
    15 May 2015 Papers submission (camera ready copy)

ORGANIZER: Classification & Authority Control: Expanding Resource Discovery is the fifth biennial conference in a series of International UDC Seminars organized by the UDC Consortium (UDCC). UDCC is a not-for-profit organization, based in The Hague, established to maintain and distribute the Universal Decimal Classification and to support its use and development. UDC is one of the most widely used knowledge organization systems in the bibliographic domain.

Sunday, 17 August 2014

IFLA General Conference 2014

If you happen to be in Lyon, please join us for our regular UDC Update session at the 2014 IFLA General Conference and Assembly.

Members of the UDC Editorial team will give a brief presentation on the current developments in the UDC, ongoing translation projects, forthcoming publications and events.

Monday, 18 August
12.45-13.45
Room St. Clair 3b

The UDC Update Newsletter is available here.

Monday, 10 February 2014

Paul Otlet Lecture

Courtesy of  W. B. Rayward:

Prof. W. Boyd Rayward and Prof. Eugene Garfield have endowed a lectureship named for Paul Otlet Lecture at University of Illinois. The first lecture entitled "When Was the Age of Information?" will be delivered by Prof. Paul Duguid  from School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley) on 5. May 2014.

About the Otlet Lecture:
Paul Otlet (Photo: © Mundaneum)
Paul Otlet (1868-1944), a Belgian lawyer, bibliographer, internationalist, and pacifist, became concerned as a young man about the increasing volume and fragmentation of the literature of science and scholarship. With his colleague, Henri la Fontaine, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1913, he spent his life in building experimental “knowledge” institutions that he hoped might facilitate global access to information in a range of new formats. His analyses of what he called documentation, of multimedia substitutes for the book, of encyclopedias, museums and libraries led him to explore the possible use of the new technologies of his days such as x-rays, radio, telegraphy, cinema, sound recording and eventually television for disseminating information through a universal information network. And he proposed special organisational arrangements for the network’s management and use by means of what he called Mundaneums. He also envisaged the development of a range of new kinds of intellectual machines and instruments that, suggested by what was already available, would create new functionalities in information access and use. In these ideas we find foreshadowings of the digital and other technologies that have created such phenomena as the Internet, the World Wide Web, Google and even—and perhaps especially—Wikipedia, that are fundamental to what we now regard as a new kind of information society.